More on Assessment – Takeaways from our Second Quiz

Quiz 2 Word doc here:   Quiz 2

This quiz only had 3 questions, since Quiz 1 took too long.

 

This student has made progress since last quiz (when he had all the bars different sizes. This time, 2 of his bars are the same, but the 3rd bar has a different size. We’ll schedule time to work with him on this. Back to the Toblerones!

prob1n

Continue reading More on Assessment – Takeaways from our Second Quiz

What Does a Daily Lesson Look Like? Four Days of Activities

October Unit: PATTERNS, especially squares. Homework will continue to review fractions and word problems visually.

What does a daily lesson look like?

1. HW

  • Every other day, students hand in HW, and retrieve and correct the last HW. We mark any mistakes on their HWs, but it is their job to correct them. We put an answer key on the board – it shows work – but they cannot bring a pencil if they come to look at it. They only read it, and return to their seats to correct. For each mistake, they write a “Note to Self” reflection.  “Draw more carefully”, “Only draw unit boxes the same size if they’re the same”, “When adding fractions in 12ths, make all the fraction bars the same size”, for example. HW corrections take 5 minutes or so.
  • We collect their binders about once a week to check corrections.
  • Here are HW #6, and #7 and their keys.

Continue reading What Does a Daily Lesson Look Like? Four Days of Activities

What About Assessment and Grading? PART THREE

OVERVIEW, Part One: (Tuesday)

1) Changing Unit Planning     (2) Changing Instruction      (3) Changing Homework

PART TWO: (Yesterday)

4. Changing Assessment

PART THREE (today):

5. Changing Grading

 

5. Changing Grading

Ideally,  grades would not be necessary in a effective math classroom. However, as we move toward that ideal, most schools continue to require that we give grades. Continue reading What About Assessment and Grading? PART THREE

More HW examples

Three more examples of homework.

Our next unit is Patterns, but as we move forward, we continue to review fractions and word problems visually and computationally (Levels 1 and 2) on homework. Some students will need weeks of practice on these two skills visually before they are mastered conceptually. Homework is a great place to allow them to continue solidifying those visual skills. Faster-working students will sail through Levels 1 and 2 in a few minutes and have time to work on challenge problems. Continue reading More HW examples

Bar Fractions and Snowflake Fractions

1. Bar Fractions

This activity is adapted from Jo Boaler’s “Mindset Mathematics – Grade 5”, page 106. The only change we made is to use a bar rather than a square. We will use squares for a fraction activity later this week.

Step One (Concrete)

Pass out 5 blocks to each child: 2 Red, 2 Blue and 1 Green(or other color…) We use snap cubes, but any cubes will work. Alternatively, squares of construction paper will work. Continue reading Bar Fractions and Snowflake Fractions

WEEK THREE – Activity TWO – More Word Problems

Let’s Play ‘Alpha Beta Gamma’.

We like this game because it encourages cooperation without leading to too much competition between groups. Since the composition of each group changes constantly, students don’t feel overly tied to the scores of a given group. Continue reading WEEK THREE – Activity TWO – More Word Problems

WEEK THREE – Activity One; Word Problems, + a Note on Differentiation

Our first unit is a twin unit of Fractions (mostly visual) and Word problems. We begin working with both these topics very early in the year, so that we have all year to incorporate them into every unit.  We find that word problems are an excellent way to teach fractions, too. Our next two units will be place value, patterns and multiplication, after which we will return to fractions in more depth.

This introduction to 5th grade word problems starts at the concrete, as it should.

Procedure:

PROBLEM ONE

  1. Pass out a handful of rainbow cubes (smallest base-10 blocks) or similar per child.
  2. Have each child count out 11 blocks, and set the others aside.
  3. Project or write up Problem 1.

Continue reading WEEK THREE – Activity One; Word Problems, + a Note on Differentiation